36 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

T +44 (0) 20 7958 8251
admin@lidc.bloomsbury.ac.uk

LIDC blog

Despite the fact that men's behaviour increases the HIV transmission risks of both men and women, programmes and policy continue to focus on the behaviour and actions of women. This blog explores the flaws in this approach, and argues that HIV prevention efforts must now examine men and masculinities. 

Birsha Ohdedar explores the links between climate change and human rights in the context of access to water in India.

Who Does the Research on Aid Effectiveness? It Matters.

The call to rethink development aid as a catalyst of development efforts, and not as development’s main mover, is now part of mainstream development discourse, including institutions like the World Bank. The next, inevitable, step will be to understand under which conditions aid can play the role of a catalyst. Two policy dialogues organised last year by the Global Development Network and partners, concluded that if we want to answer the question of effectiveness of aid, both government and researchers of aid receiving countries need to take a lead in setting the aid effectiveness research agenda.

In this new blog post series, we will be hearing from recent graduates about their experiences in entry-level development roles. In this first post, recent SOAS graduate Pankhuri Agarwal writes about her experience of working in India against human trafficking.

The global water crisis is happening right now. WaterAid states that “a lack of safe water, proper toilets and good hygiene affects women and girls most” making water poverty undoubtedly a gender issue. However, if we are going to properly understand and account for all experiences of water poverty, we need to change the way we think about gender, women, and water.

Why is Communicating in Local Languages Important?

What is the most important problem or barrier to be addressed when giving someone the knowledge and confidence to do a mission critical job? We suggest it is how you communicate the key information to empower locals and then the ease with which they can translate that knowledge into practical action.

Statelessness is a global issue, affecting millions and it often leads to human rights violations and exclusion from development processes. Whilst there has been a lack of recognition of statelessness and its detrimental effects in international development, recent efforts by both civil society organisations and UN agencies signal a hopeful move towards making ending statelessness a priority.

The minority Hazara community of Pakistan has been in the grip of sectarian violence for decades. Amidst the conflict, most Hazaras have fled the country while others await their predetermined fate. In this time of hopelessness and chaos, Pakistan's national education system, which is laden with bias and propaganda, plays a crucial role in fuelling tension between communities. It is high time the government introduces educational policy reform as a step toward conflict resolution and peacebuilding.

At the LIDC Biennial Conference on 'Interdisciplinary Approaches to Inequality' in April we had an afternoon of parallel sessions on a range of issues including health and nutrition, education, corruption, linguistics and economics and infrastructure. Here is a sum up of the key points of each session and the issues and solutions discussed.

“We need to think of humanity as one of the key driving forces of global environmental change”. Human beings are changing ecosystems globally, and this is having a profound impact on our ability to feed ourselves. Researchers working on issues of global hunger must now take an increasingly dynamic approach to hunger because hunger is shifting. Hunger today is in transition, changing alongside human health and the global climate.

Pages