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LIDC blog

The management of natural resource wealth is one of the most critical challenges posed to developing countries nowadays and it has been the case throughout history; from the diamonds of Sierra Leone to the oil of Venezuela, and the ivory of Tanzania. At least 40 percent of internal conflicts worldwide are linked to natural resources yet it would be far too simplistic to state that availability triggers conflict directly.  

Building Human Capital in Latin America

When regions of the world are compared in terms of long run economic growth, Latin America ranks at the bottom along with Sub-Saharan Africa. Countries in the region, in consideration of the Gini coefficient, are nearly 30% more unequal than the global average. Some 74 million Latin Americans (about 12.4% of the region’s population) live on less than $2 per day. Over half of them are children. And, in Brazil, children in the bottom income quintile complete an average of eight years of school versus over ten years completed by children in the top income quintile.

The literature on Economics and International Relations displays a heavy use of the term ‘Emerging Economies’, which is often associated with both developed and developing countries. Yet it has not been entirely accepted neither as an economic notion nor as a political one, mostly because the complexity in the dissimilar markets that integrate the emerging set  has cast doubt on the appropriateness of the term to encompass so much diversity.

If developing countries are serious about sparking economic growth, they need to be active in reforming their bureaucracies, promoting policies that allow larger proportions of the unbanked populous into the formal banking sector.

In November 2017 LIDC held a careers networking event showcasing different routes into development work. Find out the advice and tips that our speakers shared on how to get your first job in international development

Where the Truth Lies: Teachers and the Media in Mexico

A free press is crucial in society to hold authority to account. Investigative journalists are the public’s greatest ally, and often put themselves in the line of fire to expose the truth. Few places are more dangerous for digging under the skin of power than Mexico. We need to recognise that the media is not just in the business of reflecting public opinion, but also of creating it.  

Restrictions on the movement of refugees has meant that thousands of people are stuck in countries of transit; and host countries are struggling to meet the needs of the refugees. As a result of this, refugees are living in dire conditions, significantly impacting their psychological and general health, including oral health. 

International Day of Peace: The role of teachers in peacebuilding in post-conflict societies

Teachers have the potential to assist peacebuilding in post-conflict societies. This is particularly relevant where structural inequalities persist and teachers, schools and students have been an integral part of violent conflict both as victims and perpetrator of violence. 

The inclusion of men and masculinities in development work is vital for gender equality, as many feminist initiatives have focused on inequalities against women and it's prevention without including men, who may perpetuate, witness or heighten gender inequalities.

Despite the fact that men's behaviour increases the HIV transmission risks of both men and women, programmes and policy continue to focus on the behaviour and actions of women. This blog explores the flaws in this approach, and argues that HIV prevention efforts must now examine men and masculinities.