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Blog posts in the category - Communications

Why is Communicating in Local Languages Important?

What is the most important problem or barrier to be addressed when giving someone the knowledge and confidence to do a mission critical job? We suggest it is how you communicate the key information to empower locals and then the ease with which they can translate that knowledge into practical action.

Statelessness is a global issue, affecting millions and it often leads to human rights violations and exclusion from development processes. Whilst there has been a lack of recognition of statelessness and its detrimental effects in international development, recent efforts by both civil society organisations and UN agencies signal a hopeful move towards making ending statelessness a priority.

Last year, our eight-week radio project in Somalia gathered nearly 20,000 text messages from over 8400 people. Impressive numbers - but did the data tell us anything interesting or useful? Was the data authentic and of high quality, and were we able to translate it into actionable insights?

Posts about women fill development organisations’ Twitter streams. Far from being a sign that we are progressing towards the internationally recognised objective of gender equality, this might just be another blow to it.

Digital Leisure and Development

In this technology driven world, introduction of technology to the digitally backward has become a popular agenda for development

The recent Ebola epidemic in West Africa brought home the importance of preparedness and risk communication is a situation of a disease outbreak. 

Last week the global development circus descended on a neo-gothic warehouse in Brussels. The event is connected to the wider European Year for Development.

Who is afraid of … a journalist?

I have just come back after a week in Morogoro, Tanzania, where I facilitated a workshop on communications and audience engagement for researchers at the Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SACIDS) based at the Sokoine University of Agriculture. 

Last month I attended the first ResUp MeetUp symposium and training exchange organised in Nairobi by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) and African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDED), with funding from UK Department for International Development (DFID).

The meeting gathered together about 150 research uptake specialists from across the world, working in academia, think tanks and NGOs.

Inter-collegiate, interdisciplinary events are always a pleasure to go to, and not only because of LIDC’s focus on interdisciplinary research in international development working with five Bloomsbury Colleges.

That particular approach often unearths issues that would not have been unearthed otherwise, and bringing together academics with the NGO community and policy-makers makes such events even more stimulating.

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