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2016/17 Interdisciplinary Seed Fund Winners Announced

The two projects awarded the LIDC Interdisciplinary Seed Fund grant have been announced.

The Scheme, launched in 2013, aims to support new collaborative research projects in international development between academics from at least two different Bloomsbury Colleges – LIDC members (Birkbeck, Institute of Education, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, SOAS and Royal Veterinary College). The grants of up to £6,000 per project are available to support innovative ideas for international development research that are inter-sectoral and/or interdisciplinary. The programme is intended as seed funding to help collaborators across Colleges to develop new research areas, and runs on an annual basis.

The 2016/17 Seed Fund winners are:

 Project

 Awardees

Identifying peri-domestic Ebola virus reservoirs and vectors in the post-epidemic environment of Sierra Leone

  • Dr Sebastian Funk (LSHTM)
  • Prof Richard Kock (RVC)

Development of a rapid drug resistance diagnosis tool for Mycobacteria tuberculosis using whole genome sequencing

  • Dr Susana Campino (LSHTM)
  • Dr Nigel Martin (BBK)

Please see the funding page for more information.

Identifying peri-domestic Ebola virus reservoirs and vectors in the post-epidemic environment of Sierra Leone: In response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014, which severely affected human population, this project will evaluate the potential of peridomestic species (especially livestock) as reservoir hosts and/or vectors of the virus. The study brings together veterinary and human epidemiologists and mathematical modellers from two different Bloomsbury colleges (RVC and LSHTM), making it a truly interdisciplinary study.

Development of a rapid drug resistance diagnosis tool for Mycobacteria tuberculosis using whole genome sequencing: This interdiscplinary collaboration between LSHTM and Birkbeck seeks to address the public health concern surrounding emerging resistance to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs. This project will test the capacity of selective whole genome amplification (SWGA) and assess the performance of whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the amplified DNA, with the aim to obtain information on mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes in only a few days and directly from patient sputum.